Myths About Miscarriage - 7 Things I Believed About Loss


There are so many myths about miscarriage and the less we talk about miscarriage, the more these beliefs are going to continue. So for this Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month, I thought I'd share some of the myths I believed about miscarriage prior to having two of my own:

1. IT'S NOT A BIG DEAL



I had rarely heard anyone talk about miscarriage and when I did it was always in a very casual "oh yeah, so and so had a miscarriage" type thing. I had no idea that having a miscarriage could be a traumatic experience.

2. IT ALWAYS HAPPENS VERY EARLY

I had always heard of miscarriages happening early in pregnancy some time directly after someone finds out they're pregnant. I had no idea that miscarriage is actually defined as a loss before 20 weeks.

3. THE EARLIER THE EASIER

A common response to finding out that someone has had a miscarriage is "at least it was early". This statement completely diminishes the feelings many people have about their miscarriage. Loss is loss.

4. YOUR PREGNANCY SYMPTOMS IMMEDIATELY DISAPPEAR



Did you know your baby can die inside of you and you can continue having pregnancy symptoms? I had no idea until it happened to me. The medical term for this is "missed miscarriage".

5. IT'S JUST A LITTLE BLOOD 


From joining miscarriage support groups I've learned that when some people miscarry, they can differentiate between what comes out. I've seen numerous photos of people sharing their amniotic sac, for an example. Previous to learning this I had always assumed a miscarriage was basically just a person passing some blood similar to having a period.

6. IT'S QUICK AND SIMPLE

I don't know why, but I had assumed that having a miscarriage was a pretty quick and "easy" thing. I thought you basically just pass some blood one day and the next day it's done. I've since learned from others that you can bleed for several weeks and I've learned from experience that sometimes our bodies don't miscarry on their own so we need additional care such as a D&C.

7. IT'S RARE



Because I had rarely heard anyone talk about miscarriage, I assumed it was rare. In reality, however, miscarriage is actually pretty common. The most widely shared statistic is 1 in 4. That's one in every four people who get pregnant. That's a lot of people! Chances are you know at least one person who has had a miscarriage.

These myths affect how people are cared for by medical professionals. They affect how our loved ones show up (or don't show up) for us. And ultimately, these myths can negatively shape how we feel about our own experiences with miscarriage.

What are some myths you have heard about miscarriage? Share them down below. Let's talk about it.


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